My Blog

Posts for: July, 2012

By Dr. Jeffrey R. Wert & Associates - Family Dentistry
July 25, 2012
Category: Oral Health
DidYouKnowThatDiabetesAndPeriodontalDiseaseHaveMuchInCommon

Did you know that recent research has shown diabetes is a risk factor for increased severity of periodontal (gum) disease and that periodontitis is a risk factor for worsening blood glucose (sugar) control in people with diabetes? Periodontitis can even increase the risk of diabetic complications for people diagnosed with diabetes. When you combine these facts with the following, you will clearly see how important it is to understand and manage these two diseases.

  • Over 23 million people in the United States currently have diabetes and over 170 million worldwide.
  • 14+ million Americans have a condition called pre-diabetes.
  • Another estimated 6 million people in the US have diabetes but are unaware and thus not diagnosed.
  • Periodontal disease is the second most common disease known to man, only surpassed by tooth decay.
  • Diabetic individuals with periodontal disease have a greater risk for cardiovascular and kidney complications than those diabetics not having periodontal disease.

What You Can Do

One of the most important steps you can take if you have either of these conditions or suspect that you might have one or both is to make an appointment with your physician or with our office for a thorough examination. You should schedule an appointment with your physician for an exam and blood work so that your general health and well-being are monitored. Be certain to share your medical information and any family history of diabetes with our office, as it tends to occur in families.

Learn More

Learn the risks and how to take care of types 1 and 2 diabetes, as well as the stages of periodontal disease (with detailed full-color illustrations) when you read the Dear Doctor article, “Diabetes & Periodontal Disease.” Or if you want to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions, contact us today.


By Dr. Jeffrey R. Wert & Associates - Family Dentistry
July 17, 2012
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   tmd   tmj  
WhatCouldBeCausingYourTemporomandibularDisorderTMD

When treating Temporomandibular (jaw joint) Disorder (formerly known as Temporomandibular Joint Disorder, TMJ), we feel we have two equally important challenges facing us. First, we must start your treatment by relieving the symptoms of pain and discomfort. We typically accomplish this with heat, mild pain medications, a diet of soft foods, and some simple jaw exercises. Once we have begun to relieve your pain, our second critical objective is to identify and remedy what is causing the pain. It could be the result of an injury or trauma to the jaws and/or teeth or it could be due to a bite issue or a filling or crown that is too high and thus causing a misaligned bite. There are many other reasons, so it is first necessary to obtain a thorough medical history and conduct a comprehensive evaluation so that we can properly diagnose and treat the TMD condition and what is causing it.

Next to stress resulting in clenching and grinding habits, the four most common causes leading to TMD include:

  • Underlying dental conditions that are triggering muscle pain
  • Internal joint derangement (displaced or improperly positioned jaw joint)
  • Osteoarthritis (degenerative joint disease)
  • Synovitis — the painful inflammation of a synovial joint-lining membrane that is characterized by swelling, due to effusion (fluid collection)

If you or another family member suffer from chronic jaw pain, please let us know so that we can properly address your concerns and conduct a thorough examination. Or if you are in constant or severe pain, contact us as soon as possible to schedule an appointment. You can learn more about the signs, symptoms, and treatment options for TMD by reading “TMD — Understanding The Great Imposter.”


By Dr. Jeffrey R. Wert & Associates - Family Dentistry
July 09, 2012
Category: Oral Health
FrequentlyAskedQuestionsAboutHeartandGumDiseases

Recent research has revealed that there is a link between cardiovascular (“cardio” – heart; “vascular” – blood vessel) disease (CVD) and periodontal (gum) disease. The link is Inflammation. This is why it is important to learn more about this important relationship so that you can take proactive steps to improving your health and life.

What causes periodontal disease?
Simply put, irregular and ineffective brushing and flossing are the root causes of periodontal disease. Over time and when bacterial biofilms (dental plaque) are left unchecked, they lead to the emergence of a small set of highly pathogenic (“patho” – disease; “genic” – causing) organisms that are consistently associated with periodontitis (“peri” – gum; “odont” – tooth; “itis” – inflammation) or gum disease.

Is periodontal disease common or am I one of the few who have it?
It is a quite common disease, with mild to moderate forms of it impacting 30 to 50% of US adults. More severe cases affect 5 to 15%. One of the reasons these numbers are so high is because periodontal disease is a silent, painless disease that often occurs without any symptoms.

So how does my gum disease link to potential heart disease?
Inflammation is a characteristic of chronic disease. People with moderate to severe periodontitis have increased levels of systemic (general body) inflammation. If left untreated, the same bacterial strains that are commonly found in periodontal pockets surrounding diseased teeth have been found in blood vessel plaques of people with CVD.

This all sounds bad...is there any good news?
Yes! Research has revealed that if periodontal disease is treated, inflammation and infection can be reduced. This also reduces the risk for heart attacks and strokes, both of which are common results of CVD. All it may take is a thorough exam for gum disease and thorough dental cleaning. During your exam, we can also make sure you are brushing and flossing properly so that you are effectively removing bacterial biofilm. But if you have severe periodontal disease, you may need deeper cleanings and more advanced treatment to save your teeth and your heart.

To learn more on this subject, continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Link Between Heart & Gum Diseases.” You can also contact us today with any questions or to schedule an appointment.


By Dr. Jeffrey R. Wert & Associates - Family Dentistry
July 01, 2012
Category: Dental Procedures
ToothReplacementItsComeaLongWay

Twenty-first Century techniques can create a replacement for a missing or damaged tooth that looks exactly like a natural tooth and actually fuses with the bone of your jaw. How does this amazing technology work? Test your knowledge on these questions.

What is a dental implant?
A dental implant is actually a replacement for the root of a tooth. In the natural tooth, the root is the part of the tooth below the gum line that is suspended in the bone by ligaments that attach the root to the bone. An implant is a root like substitute that is directly attached to the bone by a process referred to as osteointegration. An implant crown is then attached to the implant and is the visible part that we see above the gum tissues.

What is a modern dental implant made of?
Most are made of titanium. This metal is not rejected by the body and in fact fuses with the bone in which the implant is anchored, making it extremely stable.

How long do implants last?
A successful implant can last a lifetime. Factors that can affect an implant's success are smoking, certain drugs, osteoporosis, a history of radiation treatment, or a compromised immune system. We will evaluate all your conditions of dental and general health before deciding on an implant for you.

What makes the crown look like a real tooth?
The new crown looks real if it matches the shape and color of adjacent natural teeth. Its appearance also depends on what we as dentists refer to as the emergence profile (the way the crown seems to emerge from the gum tissue).

What is the function of a temporary crown?
A customized temporary crown can allow details of color, shape, and emergence profile to be worked out during this “temporary” phase of treatment. It can also test whether the tooth will function correctly for speech, biting and chewing. After these details are worked out, the temporary crown can be used as a blueprint for the permanent one.

What is the first step to getting a dental implant?
Make an appointment with us for a full assessment, diagnosis, and plan for placing the implant and crown.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss any additional questions about dental implants. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants, Your Third Set of Teeth.”